Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Please read the forum rules before posting.



Check if you are posting in the correct category.



The Off Topic section is not meant for discussing Cookie Clicker.
⚠️ The DashNet forums will be shut down on September 12th 2019.⚠️

Please see here for more information.

Dashnet RPG (Dashnet's Greatest Forum Game of All Time)

14041424345

Comments

  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    "It's hard having to live like this. but it's the one I got might as well make the most out of it."

    You take your stuff and go out to forage. You start walking around and find yourself hungry, you should probably eat your sausages.
    You find a bunch of Common White Mushrooms, you pick them up for later use in potions or something.
    iceklaus said:

    Follow Lakito to the portal.

    "I wonder how can I turn all this loot into neat items" I should ask someone for a village...

    You get back to your world, lakito greets you and goes back home
    You return to town, villagers have been waiting for some meat to buy from you for half an hour now, and seeing you have returned with dragon meat, they rush with their money to buy the delicious, and the most gracious meat in the planet. Start selling? How much of your meat do you start selling? For what price? (Average price is 3 bronze 50 copper per kg)

    Listen at each door to see if there is anyone behind them.

    You hear nothing behind the front or left doors, behind the right door there seems to be sounds of water and soaking...
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    edited May 2018
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    I'll try to sell 350kg of it.
    I sell it for 4 bronze.
    If it's not sold out I'll smoke some to make provisions and make a party.
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • YosukeHanamuraYosukeHanamura Posts: 985Member, Helpful ✭✭
    edited May 2018
    Name: Makoto (Surname: Shirogane)
    Preferred weapon:Any type of bludgeons (like hammers, axes, practically heavy weapons), any type of swords, any type of bows, any type of knives/kunais, any type of guns, any type of spears, fists, boxing gloves. Practically any weapon.
    Fantasy element: Any type of magic, from supportive, to offensive
    In modern physics, antimatter is defined as a material composed of the antiparticle (or "partners") to the corresponding particles of ordinary matter.

    In theory, a particle and its anti-particle have the same mass as one another, but opposite electric charge, and other differences in quantum numbers. For example, a proton has positive charge while an antiproton has negative charge. A collision between any particle and its anti-particle partner is known to lead to their mutual annihilation, giving rise to various proportions of intense photons (gamma rays), neutrinos, and sometimes less-massive particle–antiparticle pairs.

    Annihilation usually results in a release of energy that becomes available for heat or work. The amount of the released energy is usually proportional to the total mass of the collided matter and antimatter, in accord with the mass–energy equivalence equation, E = mc2.

    Antimatter particles bind with one another to form antimatter, just as ordinary particles bind to form normal matter. For example, a positron (the antiparticle of the electron) and an antiproton (the antiparticle of the proton) can form an antihydrogen atom. Physical principles indicate that complex antimatter atomic nuclei are possible, as well as anti-atoms corresponding to the known chemical elements.

    There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is composed almost entirely of ordinary matter, as opposed to an equal mixture of matter and antimatter. This asymmetry of matter and antimatter in the visible universe is one of the great unsolved problems in physics. The process by which this inequality between matter and antimatter particles developed is called baryogenesis.

    Antimatter in the form of anti-atoms is one of the most difficult materials to produce. Individual antimatter particles, however, are commonly produced by particle accelerators and in some types of radioactive decay. The nuclei of antihelium have been artificially produced with difficulty. These are the most complex anti-nuclei so far observed.

    Formally, antimatter particles can be defined by their negative baryon number or lepton number, while "normal" (non-antimatter) matter particles have a positive baryon or lepton number. These two classes of particles are the antiparticle partners of one another.

    The idea of negative matter appears in past theories of matter that have now been abandoned. Using the once popular vortex theory of gravity, the possibility of matter with negative gravity was discussed by William Hicks in the 1880s. Between the 1880s and the 1890s, Karl Pearson proposed the existence of "squirts" and sinks of the flow of aether. The squirts represented normal matter and the sinks represented negative matter. Pearson's theory required a fourth dimension for the aether to flow from and into.

    The term antimatter was first used by Arthur Schuster in two rather whimsical letters to Nature in 1898, in which he coined the term. He hypothesized antiatoms, as well as whole antimatter solar systems, and discussed the possibility of matter and antimatter annihilating each other. Schuster's ideas were not a serious theoretical proposal, merely speculation, and like the previous ideas, differed from the modern concept of antimatter in that it possessed negative gravity.

    The modern theory of antimatter began in 1928, with a paper by Paul Dirac. Dirac realised that his relativistic version of the Schrödinger wave equation for electrons predicted the possibility of antielectrons. These were discovered by Carl D. Anderson in 1932 and named positrons (a portmanteau of "positive electron"). Although Dirac did not himself use the term antimatter, its use follows on naturally enough from antielectrons, antiprotons, etc. A complete periodic table of antimatter was envisaged by Charles Janet in 1929.

    The Feynman–Stueckelberg interpretation states that antimatter and antiparticles are regular particles traveling backward in time.

    There are compelling theoretical reasons to believe that, aside from the fact that antiparticles have different signs on all charges (such as electric charge and spin), matter and antimatter have exactly the same properties. This means a particle and its corresponding antiparticle must have identical masses and decay lifetimes (if unstable). It also implies that, for example, a star made up of antimatter (an "antistar") will shine just like an ordinary star. This idea was tested experimentally in 2016 by the ALPHA experiment, which measured the transition between the two lowest energy states of antihydrogen. The results, which are identical to that of hydrogen, confirmed the validity of quantum mechanics for antimatter.

    Positrons were reported in November 2008 to have been generated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in larger numbers than by any previous synthetic process. A laser drove electrons through a gold target's nuclei, which caused the incoming electrons to emit energy quanta that decayed into both matter and antimatter. Positrons were detected at a higher rate and in greater density than ever previously detected in a laboratory. Previous experiments made smaller quantities of positrons using lasers and paper-thin targets; however, new simulations showed that short, ultra-intense lasers and millimeter-thick gold are a far more effective source.

    Antimatter cannot be stored in a container made of ordinary matter because antimatter reacts with any matter it touches, annihilating itself and an equal amount of the container. Antimatter in the form of charged particles can be contained by a combination of electric and magnetic fields, in a device called a Penning trap. This device cannot, however, contain antimatter that consists of uncharged particles, for which atomic traps are used. In particular, such a trap may use the dipole moment (electric or magnetic) of the trapped particles. At high vacuum, the matter or antimatter particles can be trapped and cooled with slightly off-resonant laser radiation using a magneto-optical trap or magnetic trap. Small particles can also be suspended with optical tweezers, using a highly focused laser beam.

    In 2011, CERN scientists were able to preserve antihydrogen for approximately 17 minutes.

    Scientists claim that antimatter is the costliest material to make. In 2006, Gerald Smith estimated $250 million could produce 10 milligrams of positrons (equivalent to $25 billion per gram); in 1999, NASA gave a figure of $62.5 trillion per gram of antihydrogen. This is because production is difficult (only very few antiprotons are produced in reactions in particle accelerators), and because there is higher demand for other uses of particle accelerators. According to CERN, it has cost a few hundred million Swiss francs to produce about 1 billionth of a gram (the amount used so far for particle/antiparticle collisions). In comparison, to produce the first atomic weapon, the cost of the Manhattan Project was estimated at $23 billion with inflation during 2007.

    Several studies funded by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts are exploring whether it might be possible to use magnetic scoops to collect the antimatter that occurs naturally in the Van Allen belt of the Earth, and ultimately, the belts of gas giants, like Jupiter, hopefully at a lower cost per gram.

    Matter–antimatter reactions have practical applications in medical imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET). In positive beta decay, a nuclide loses surplus positive charge by emitting a positron (in the same event, a proton becomes a neutron, and a neutrino is also emitted). Nuclides with surplus positive charge are easily made in a cyclotron and are widely generated for medical use. Antiprotons have also been shown within laboratory experiments to have the potential to treat certain cancers, in a similar method currently used for ion (proton) therapy.

    Antimatter has been considered as a trigger mechanism for nuclear weapons. A major obstacle is the difficulty of producing antimatter in large enough quantities, and there is no evidence that it will ever be feasible. However, the U.S. Air Force funded studies of the physics of antimatter in the Cold War, and began considering its possible use in weapons, not just as a trigger, but as the explosive itself.
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    iceklaus said:

    I'll try to sell 350kg of it.
    I sell it for 4 bronze.
    If it's not sold out I'll smoke some to make provisions and make a party.

    But your share was 200 kg

    Name: Makoto (Surname: Shirogane)
    Preferred weapon:Any type of bludgeons (like hammers, axes, practically heavy weapons), any type of swords, any type of bows, any type of knives/kunais, any type of guns, any type of spears, fists, boxing gloves. Practically any weapon.
    Fantasy element: Any type of magic, from supportive, to offensive

    Can you choose one specific weapon and element, please?
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    sorry, 180kg
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    iceklaus said:

    sorry, 180kg

    You start selling, it quickly gets sold out and you are now 7 silver and 20 bronze richer.
    The market is still thirsty, go home or keep selling?
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • YosukeHanamuraYosukeHanamura Posts: 985Member, Helpful ✭✭
    I wanted to be a generalist: A jack of all trades, i mean, can use everything, but is not as good as someone on a single element/weapon, but oh well.

    Weapon:2H Swords.
    Element: Antimatter Darkness
    In modern physics, antimatter is defined as a material composed of the antiparticle (or "partners") to the corresponding particles of ordinary matter.

    In theory, a particle and its anti-particle have the same mass as one another, but opposite electric charge, and other differences in quantum numbers. For example, a proton has positive charge while an antiproton has negative charge. A collision between any particle and its anti-particle partner is known to lead to their mutual annihilation, giving rise to various proportions of intense photons (gamma rays), neutrinos, and sometimes less-massive particle–antiparticle pairs.

    Annihilation usually results in a release of energy that becomes available for heat or work. The amount of the released energy is usually proportional to the total mass of the collided matter and antimatter, in accord with the mass–energy equivalence equation, E = mc2.

    Antimatter particles bind with one another to form antimatter, just as ordinary particles bind to form normal matter. For example, a positron (the antiparticle of the electron) and an antiproton (the antiparticle of the proton) can form an antihydrogen atom. Physical principles indicate that complex antimatter atomic nuclei are possible, as well as anti-atoms corresponding to the known chemical elements.

    There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is composed almost entirely of ordinary matter, as opposed to an equal mixture of matter and antimatter. This asymmetry of matter and antimatter in the visible universe is one of the great unsolved problems in physics. The process by which this inequality between matter and antimatter particles developed is called baryogenesis.

    Antimatter in the form of anti-atoms is one of the most difficult materials to produce. Individual antimatter particles, however, are commonly produced by particle accelerators and in some types of radioactive decay. The nuclei of antihelium have been artificially produced with difficulty. These are the most complex anti-nuclei so far observed.

    Formally, antimatter particles can be defined by their negative baryon number or lepton number, while "normal" (non-antimatter) matter particles have a positive baryon or lepton number. These two classes of particles are the antiparticle partners of one another.

    The idea of negative matter appears in past theories of matter that have now been abandoned. Using the once popular vortex theory of gravity, the possibility of matter with negative gravity was discussed by William Hicks in the 1880s. Between the 1880s and the 1890s, Karl Pearson proposed the existence of "squirts" and sinks of the flow of aether. The squirts represented normal matter and the sinks represented negative matter. Pearson's theory required a fourth dimension for the aether to flow from and into.

    The term antimatter was first used by Arthur Schuster in two rather whimsical letters to Nature in 1898, in which he coined the term. He hypothesized antiatoms, as well as whole antimatter solar systems, and discussed the possibility of matter and antimatter annihilating each other. Schuster's ideas were not a serious theoretical proposal, merely speculation, and like the previous ideas, differed from the modern concept of antimatter in that it possessed negative gravity.

    The modern theory of antimatter began in 1928, with a paper by Paul Dirac. Dirac realised that his relativistic version of the Schrödinger wave equation for electrons predicted the possibility of antielectrons. These were discovered by Carl D. Anderson in 1932 and named positrons (a portmanteau of "positive electron"). Although Dirac did not himself use the term antimatter, its use follows on naturally enough from antielectrons, antiprotons, etc. A complete periodic table of antimatter was envisaged by Charles Janet in 1929.

    The Feynman–Stueckelberg interpretation states that antimatter and antiparticles are regular particles traveling backward in time.

    There are compelling theoretical reasons to believe that, aside from the fact that antiparticles have different signs on all charges (such as electric charge and spin), matter and antimatter have exactly the same properties. This means a particle and its corresponding antiparticle must have identical masses and decay lifetimes (if unstable). It also implies that, for example, a star made up of antimatter (an "antistar") will shine just like an ordinary star. This idea was tested experimentally in 2016 by the ALPHA experiment, which measured the transition between the two lowest energy states of antihydrogen. The results, which are identical to that of hydrogen, confirmed the validity of quantum mechanics for antimatter.

    Positrons were reported in November 2008 to have been generated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in larger numbers than by any previous synthetic process. A laser drove electrons through a gold target's nuclei, which caused the incoming electrons to emit energy quanta that decayed into both matter and antimatter. Positrons were detected at a higher rate and in greater density than ever previously detected in a laboratory. Previous experiments made smaller quantities of positrons using lasers and paper-thin targets; however, new simulations showed that short, ultra-intense lasers and millimeter-thick gold are a far more effective source.

    Antimatter cannot be stored in a container made of ordinary matter because antimatter reacts with any matter it touches, annihilating itself and an equal amount of the container. Antimatter in the form of charged particles can be contained by a combination of electric and magnetic fields, in a device called a Penning trap. This device cannot, however, contain antimatter that consists of uncharged particles, for which atomic traps are used. In particular, such a trap may use the dipole moment (electric or magnetic) of the trapped particles. At high vacuum, the matter or antimatter particles can be trapped and cooled with slightly off-resonant laser radiation using a magneto-optical trap or magnetic trap. Small particles can also be suspended with optical tweezers, using a highly focused laser beam.

    In 2011, CERN scientists were able to preserve antihydrogen for approximately 17 minutes.

    Scientists claim that antimatter is the costliest material to make. In 2006, Gerald Smith estimated $250 million could produce 10 milligrams of positrons (equivalent to $25 billion per gram); in 1999, NASA gave a figure of $62.5 trillion per gram of antihydrogen. This is because production is difficult (only very few antiprotons are produced in reactions in particle accelerators), and because there is higher demand for other uses of particle accelerators. According to CERN, it has cost a few hundred million Swiss francs to produce about 1 billionth of a gram (the amount used so far for particle/antiparticle collisions). In comparison, to produce the first atomic weapon, the cost of the Manhattan Project was estimated at $23 billion with inflation during 2007.

    Several studies funded by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts are exploring whether it might be possible to use magnetic scoops to collect the antimatter that occurs naturally in the Van Allen belt of the Earth, and ultimately, the belts of gas giants, like Jupiter, hopefully at a lower cost per gram.

    Matter–antimatter reactions have practical applications in medical imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET). In positive beta decay, a nuclide loses surplus positive charge by emitting a positron (in the same event, a proton becomes a neutron, and a neutrino is also emitted). Nuclides with surplus positive charge are easily made in a cyclotron and are widely generated for medical use. Antiprotons have also been shown within laboratory experiments to have the potential to treat certain cancers, in a similar method currently used for ion (proton) therapy.

    Antimatter has been considered as a trigger mechanism for nuclear weapons. A major obstacle is the difficulty of producing antimatter in large enough quantities, and there is no evidence that it will ever be feasible. However, the U.S. Air Force funded studies of the physics of antimatter in the Cold War, and began considering its possible use in weapons, not just as a trigger, but as the explosive itself.
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    that's for my private stash and future business/hunting.... I wonder what can I get by using dragon meat as bait.

    heat to the forest, my calm, mob free place.
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • MrMonkey7thMrMonkey7th Posts: 1,315Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Go left
    e^i*π=-1
    This forum: Not dead. Just... sleeping.
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    I wanted to be a generalist: A jack of all trades, i mean, can use everything, but is not as good as someone on a single element/weapon, but oh well.

    Weapon:2H Swords.
    Element: Antimatter Darkness

    I wanted to be a generalist: A jack of all trades, i mean, can use everything, but is not as good as someone on a single element/weapon, but oh well.

    Weapon:2H Swords.
    Element: Antimatter Darkness

    Alright, now choose one of the following backstories or respin for more

    Makato, a freelancer/contract assassin in the dark kingdom, his job is killing people and doing tasks for whoever asks so, half-fox dark human.

    Makato, a thief living in a town in Nexonin, lives in a cave on the outskirts of the town.
    iceklaus said:

    that's for my private stash and future business/hunting.... I wonder what can I get by using dragon meat as bait.

    heat to the forest, my calm, mob free place.

    You head to the forest, calm as always... birds are chirping in the trees, and it seems a new flock of birds has arrived into the forest.

    Go left

    You go left, you seem to have entered another bedroom, bunch of drawers and beds and closets and a rug, two windows, and no more doors besides one leading back where you came and one leading south
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • YosukeHanamuraYosukeHanamura Posts: 985Member, Helpful ✭✭
    EHEM, it's "Makoto", i choose the thief one.
    In modern physics, antimatter is defined as a material composed of the antiparticle (or "partners") to the corresponding particles of ordinary matter.

    In theory, a particle and its anti-particle have the same mass as one another, but opposite electric charge, and other differences in quantum numbers. For example, a proton has positive charge while an antiproton has negative charge. A collision between any particle and its anti-particle partner is known to lead to their mutual annihilation, giving rise to various proportions of intense photons (gamma rays), neutrinos, and sometimes less-massive particle–antiparticle pairs.

    Annihilation usually results in a release of energy that becomes available for heat or work. The amount of the released energy is usually proportional to the total mass of the collided matter and antimatter, in accord with the mass–energy equivalence equation, E = mc2.

    Antimatter particles bind with one another to form antimatter, just as ordinary particles bind to form normal matter. For example, a positron (the antiparticle of the electron) and an antiproton (the antiparticle of the proton) can form an antihydrogen atom. Physical principles indicate that complex antimatter atomic nuclei are possible, as well as anti-atoms corresponding to the known chemical elements.

    There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is composed almost entirely of ordinary matter, as opposed to an equal mixture of matter and antimatter. This asymmetry of matter and antimatter in the visible universe is one of the great unsolved problems in physics. The process by which this inequality between matter and antimatter particles developed is called baryogenesis.

    Antimatter in the form of anti-atoms is one of the most difficult materials to produce. Individual antimatter particles, however, are commonly produced by particle accelerators and in some types of radioactive decay. The nuclei of antihelium have been artificially produced with difficulty. These are the most complex anti-nuclei so far observed.

    Formally, antimatter particles can be defined by their negative baryon number or lepton number, while "normal" (non-antimatter) matter particles have a positive baryon or lepton number. These two classes of particles are the antiparticle partners of one another.

    The idea of negative matter appears in past theories of matter that have now been abandoned. Using the once popular vortex theory of gravity, the possibility of matter with negative gravity was discussed by William Hicks in the 1880s. Between the 1880s and the 1890s, Karl Pearson proposed the existence of "squirts" and sinks of the flow of aether. The squirts represented normal matter and the sinks represented negative matter. Pearson's theory required a fourth dimension for the aether to flow from and into.

    The term antimatter was first used by Arthur Schuster in two rather whimsical letters to Nature in 1898, in which he coined the term. He hypothesized antiatoms, as well as whole antimatter solar systems, and discussed the possibility of matter and antimatter annihilating each other. Schuster's ideas were not a serious theoretical proposal, merely speculation, and like the previous ideas, differed from the modern concept of antimatter in that it possessed negative gravity.

    The modern theory of antimatter began in 1928, with a paper by Paul Dirac. Dirac realised that his relativistic version of the Schrödinger wave equation for electrons predicted the possibility of antielectrons. These were discovered by Carl D. Anderson in 1932 and named positrons (a portmanteau of "positive electron"). Although Dirac did not himself use the term antimatter, its use follows on naturally enough from antielectrons, antiprotons, etc. A complete periodic table of antimatter was envisaged by Charles Janet in 1929.

    The Feynman–Stueckelberg interpretation states that antimatter and antiparticles are regular particles traveling backward in time.

    There are compelling theoretical reasons to believe that, aside from the fact that antiparticles have different signs on all charges (such as electric charge and spin), matter and antimatter have exactly the same properties. This means a particle and its corresponding antiparticle must have identical masses and decay lifetimes (if unstable). It also implies that, for example, a star made up of antimatter (an "antistar") will shine just like an ordinary star. This idea was tested experimentally in 2016 by the ALPHA experiment, which measured the transition between the two lowest energy states of antihydrogen. The results, which are identical to that of hydrogen, confirmed the validity of quantum mechanics for antimatter.

    Positrons were reported in November 2008 to have been generated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in larger numbers than by any previous synthetic process. A laser drove electrons through a gold target's nuclei, which caused the incoming electrons to emit energy quanta that decayed into both matter and antimatter. Positrons were detected at a higher rate and in greater density than ever previously detected in a laboratory. Previous experiments made smaller quantities of positrons using lasers and paper-thin targets; however, new simulations showed that short, ultra-intense lasers and millimeter-thick gold are a far more effective source.

    Antimatter cannot be stored in a container made of ordinary matter because antimatter reacts with any matter it touches, annihilating itself and an equal amount of the container. Antimatter in the form of charged particles can be contained by a combination of electric and magnetic fields, in a device called a Penning trap. This device cannot, however, contain antimatter that consists of uncharged particles, for which atomic traps are used. In particular, such a trap may use the dipole moment (electric or magnetic) of the trapped particles. At high vacuum, the matter or antimatter particles can be trapped and cooled with slightly off-resonant laser radiation using a magneto-optical trap or magnetic trap. Small particles can also be suspended with optical tweezers, using a highly focused laser beam.

    In 2011, CERN scientists were able to preserve antihydrogen for approximately 17 minutes.

    Scientists claim that antimatter is the costliest material to make. In 2006, Gerald Smith estimated $250 million could produce 10 milligrams of positrons (equivalent to $25 billion per gram); in 1999, NASA gave a figure of $62.5 trillion per gram of antihydrogen. This is because production is difficult (only very few antiprotons are produced in reactions in particle accelerators), and because there is higher demand for other uses of particle accelerators. According to CERN, it has cost a few hundred million Swiss francs to produce about 1 billionth of a gram (the amount used so far for particle/antiparticle collisions). In comparison, to produce the first atomic weapon, the cost of the Manhattan Project was estimated at $23 billion with inflation during 2007.

    Several studies funded by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts are exploring whether it might be possible to use magnetic scoops to collect the antimatter that occurs naturally in the Van Allen belt of the Earth, and ultimately, the belts of gas giants, like Jupiter, hopefully at a lower cost per gram.

    Matter–antimatter reactions have practical applications in medical imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET). In positive beta decay, a nuclide loses surplus positive charge by emitting a positron (in the same event, a proton becomes a neutron, and a neutrino is also emitted). Nuclides with surplus positive charge are easily made in a cyclotron and are widely generated for medical use. Antiprotons have also been shown within laboratory experiments to have the potential to treat certain cancers, in a similar method currently used for ion (proton) therapy.

    Antimatter has been considered as a trigger mechanism for nuclear weapons. A major obstacle is the difficulty of producing antimatter in large enough quantities, and there is no evidence that it will ever be feasible. However, the U.S. Air Force funded studies of the physics of antimatter in the Cold War, and began considering its possible use in weapons, not just as a trigger, but as the explosive itself.
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Investigate the flock.
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    EHEM, it's "Makoto", i choose the thief one.

    Username: TheMonkDude
    Old Man Jenkins

    Class: Mage
    Race: Human
    Rank: Adventurer
    Origin: Berlin Woods, Stratfort
    Equipment;
    Main set:
    Leather Cap (Headwear) (+1 Def, +1 Agi)
    NA (Facewear)
    Wooden Vest (Torso) (+3 def)
    Leather Pants (Legwear) (+2 def, +2 agi)
    Leather shoes (Footwear) (+3 spd)
    Black Staff (1-Handed Weapon) (+6 Atk, +12 Magic)

    Wealth: 0 P 0 G 0 S 0 B 60 C
    Element: Chaos
    Inventory: Cooked Sausage x2, Common White Mushroom x4
    Statistics:
    Str: Med
    Atk: 11
    Def: 11
    Spd: 8
    Agi: 7
    Max HP: 20
    Luck: 100%
    Crit.Chance: 0%
    Crit.Damage: +0%
    Magic: 22
    Intelligence: 14
    Atk Spd: Med

    Property: Small House
    Level: 1


    You wake up early in the morning, 8:00 AM, stretching, perfect time to make a good robbery.
    You stand up, you see your swords, and a cooked chicken leg you had from yesterday.
    iceklaus said:

    Investigate the flock.

    They seem to be a flock of rare rainbow birds, sometimes when cleaning the dead bodies of them, someone may find gems inside.
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    edited June 2018
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    I'll try and take 4 of them, 2 just enough to have my ration and look for gems, and 2 to keep alive and sell.

    EDIT: can you paste my current stats?
    Post edited by iceklaus on
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • YosukeHanamuraYosukeHanamura Posts: 985Member, Helpful ✭✭

    EHEM, it's "Makoto", i choose the thief one.

    Username: TheMonkDude
    Old Man Jenkins

    Class: Mage
    Race: Human
    Rank: Adventurer
    Origin: Berlin Woods, Stratfort
    Equipment;
    Main set:
    Leather Cap (Headwear) (+1 Def, +1 Agi)
    NA (Facewear)
    Wooden Vest (Torso) (+3 def)
    Leather Pants (Legwear) (+2 def, +2 agi)
    Leather shoes (Footwear) (+3 spd)
    Black Staff (1-Handed Weapon) (+6 Atk, +12 Magic)

    Wealth: 0 P 0 G 0 S 0 B 60 C
    Element: Chaos
    Inventory: Cooked Sausage x2, Common White Mushroom x4
    Statistics:
    Str: Med
    Atk: 11
    Def: 11
    Spd: 8
    Agi: 7
    Max HP: 20
    Luck: 100%
    Crit.Chance: 0%
    Crit.Damage: +0%
    Magic: 22
    Intelligence: 14
    Atk Spd: Med

    Property: Small House
    Level: 1


    You wake up early in the morning, 8:00 AM, stretching, perfect time to make a good robbery.
    You stand up, you see your swords, and a cooked chicken leg you had from yesterday.
    iceklaus said:

    Investigate the flock.

    They seem to be a flock of rare rainbow birds, sometimes when cleaning the dead bodies of them, someone may find gems inside.
    I think that's not my character xd
    In modern physics, antimatter is defined as a material composed of the antiparticle (or "partners") to the corresponding particles of ordinary matter.

    In theory, a particle and its anti-particle have the same mass as one another, but opposite electric charge, and other differences in quantum numbers. For example, a proton has positive charge while an antiproton has negative charge. A collision between any particle and its anti-particle partner is known to lead to their mutual annihilation, giving rise to various proportions of intense photons (gamma rays), neutrinos, and sometimes less-massive particle–antiparticle pairs.

    Annihilation usually results in a release of energy that becomes available for heat or work. The amount of the released energy is usually proportional to the total mass of the collided matter and antimatter, in accord with the mass–energy equivalence equation, E = mc2.

    Antimatter particles bind with one another to form antimatter, just as ordinary particles bind to form normal matter. For example, a positron (the antiparticle of the electron) and an antiproton (the antiparticle of the proton) can form an antihydrogen atom. Physical principles indicate that complex antimatter atomic nuclei are possible, as well as anti-atoms corresponding to the known chemical elements.

    There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is composed almost entirely of ordinary matter, as opposed to an equal mixture of matter and antimatter. This asymmetry of matter and antimatter in the visible universe is one of the great unsolved problems in physics. The process by which this inequality between matter and antimatter particles developed is called baryogenesis.

    Antimatter in the form of anti-atoms is one of the most difficult materials to produce. Individual antimatter particles, however, are commonly produced by particle accelerators and in some types of radioactive decay. The nuclei of antihelium have been artificially produced with difficulty. These are the most complex anti-nuclei so far observed.

    Formally, antimatter particles can be defined by their negative baryon number or lepton number, while "normal" (non-antimatter) matter particles have a positive baryon or lepton number. These two classes of particles are the antiparticle partners of one another.

    The idea of negative matter appears in past theories of matter that have now been abandoned. Using the once popular vortex theory of gravity, the possibility of matter with negative gravity was discussed by William Hicks in the 1880s. Between the 1880s and the 1890s, Karl Pearson proposed the existence of "squirts" and sinks of the flow of aether. The squirts represented normal matter and the sinks represented negative matter. Pearson's theory required a fourth dimension for the aether to flow from and into.

    The term antimatter was first used by Arthur Schuster in two rather whimsical letters to Nature in 1898, in which he coined the term. He hypothesized antiatoms, as well as whole antimatter solar systems, and discussed the possibility of matter and antimatter annihilating each other. Schuster's ideas were not a serious theoretical proposal, merely speculation, and like the previous ideas, differed from the modern concept of antimatter in that it possessed negative gravity.

    The modern theory of antimatter began in 1928, with a paper by Paul Dirac. Dirac realised that his relativistic version of the Schrödinger wave equation for electrons predicted the possibility of antielectrons. These were discovered by Carl D. Anderson in 1932 and named positrons (a portmanteau of "positive electron"). Although Dirac did not himself use the term antimatter, its use follows on naturally enough from antielectrons, antiprotons, etc. A complete periodic table of antimatter was envisaged by Charles Janet in 1929.

    The Feynman–Stueckelberg interpretation states that antimatter and antiparticles are regular particles traveling backward in time.

    There are compelling theoretical reasons to believe that, aside from the fact that antiparticles have different signs on all charges (such as electric charge and spin), matter and antimatter have exactly the same properties. This means a particle and its corresponding antiparticle must have identical masses and decay lifetimes (if unstable). It also implies that, for example, a star made up of antimatter (an "antistar") will shine just like an ordinary star. This idea was tested experimentally in 2016 by the ALPHA experiment, which measured the transition between the two lowest energy states of antihydrogen. The results, which are identical to that of hydrogen, confirmed the validity of quantum mechanics for antimatter.

    Positrons were reported in November 2008 to have been generated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in larger numbers than by any previous synthetic process. A laser drove electrons through a gold target's nuclei, which caused the incoming electrons to emit energy quanta that decayed into both matter and antimatter. Positrons were detected at a higher rate and in greater density than ever previously detected in a laboratory. Previous experiments made smaller quantities of positrons using lasers and paper-thin targets; however, new simulations showed that short, ultra-intense lasers and millimeter-thick gold are a far more effective source.

    Antimatter cannot be stored in a container made of ordinary matter because antimatter reacts with any matter it touches, annihilating itself and an equal amount of the container. Antimatter in the form of charged particles can be contained by a combination of electric and magnetic fields, in a device called a Penning trap. This device cannot, however, contain antimatter that consists of uncharged particles, for which atomic traps are used. In particular, such a trap may use the dipole moment (electric or magnetic) of the trapped particles. At high vacuum, the matter or antimatter particles can be trapped and cooled with slightly off-resonant laser radiation using a magneto-optical trap or magnetic trap. Small particles can also be suspended with optical tweezers, using a highly focused laser beam.

    In 2011, CERN scientists were able to preserve antihydrogen for approximately 17 minutes.

    Scientists claim that antimatter is the costliest material to make. In 2006, Gerald Smith estimated $250 million could produce 10 milligrams of positrons (equivalent to $25 billion per gram); in 1999, NASA gave a figure of $62.5 trillion per gram of antihydrogen. This is because production is difficult (only very few antiprotons are produced in reactions in particle accelerators), and because there is higher demand for other uses of particle accelerators. According to CERN, it has cost a few hundred million Swiss francs to produce about 1 billionth of a gram (the amount used so far for particle/antiparticle collisions). In comparison, to produce the first atomic weapon, the cost of the Manhattan Project was estimated at $23 billion with inflation during 2007.

    Several studies funded by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts are exploring whether it might be possible to use magnetic scoops to collect the antimatter that occurs naturally in the Van Allen belt of the Earth, and ultimately, the belts of gas giants, like Jupiter, hopefully at a lower cost per gram.

    Matter–antimatter reactions have practical applications in medical imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET). In positive beta decay, a nuclide loses surplus positive charge by emitting a positron (in the same event, a proton becomes a neutron, and a neutrino is also emitted). Nuclides with surplus positive charge are easily made in a cyclotron and are widely generated for medical use. Antiprotons have also been shown within laboratory experiments to have the potential to treat certain cancers, in a similar method currently used for ion (proton) therapy.

    Antimatter has been considered as a trigger mechanism for nuclear weapons. A major obstacle is the difficulty of producing antimatter in large enough quantities, and there is no evidence that it will ever be feasible. However, the U.S. Air Force funded studies of the physics of antimatter in the Cold War, and began considering its possible use in weapons, not just as a trigger, but as the explosive itself.
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    EHEM, it's "Makoto", i choose the thief one.

    Username: TheMonkDude
    Old Man Jenkins

    Class: Mage
    Race: Human
    Rank: Adventurer
    Origin: Berlin Woods, Stratfort
    Equipment;
    Main set:
    Leather Cap (Headwear) (+1 Def, +1 Agi)
    NA (Facewear)
    Wooden Vest (Torso) (+3 def)
    Leather Pants (Legwear) (+2 def, +2 agi)
    Leather shoes (Footwear) (+3 spd)
    Black Staff (1-Handed Weapon) (+6 Atk, +12 Magic)

    Wealth: 0 P 0 G 0 S 0 B 60 C
    Element: Chaos
    Inventory: Cooked Sausage x2, Common White Mushroom x4
    Statistics:
    Str: Med
    Atk: 11
    Def: 11
    Spd: 8
    Agi: 7
    Max HP: 20
    Luck: 100%
    Crit.Chance: 0%
    Crit.Damage: +0%
    Magic: 22
    Intelligence: 14
    Atk Spd: Med

    Property: Small House
    Level: 1


    You wake up early in the morning, 8:00 AM, stretching, perfect time to make a good robbery.
    You stand up, you see your swords, and a cooked chicken leg you had from yesterday.
    iceklaus said:

    Investigate the flock.

    They seem to be a flock of rare rainbow birds, sometimes when cleaning the dead bodies of them, someone may find gems inside.
    I think that's not my character xd
    Sorry I spilled cappuccino on the systems and there was a bug. Here it is, and for your lost turn, here’s a compensation of 20 copper coins
    Username: Yosuke
    Makoto

    Class: Assassin
    Race: Human
    Rank: Thief
    Origin: Reonym, Nexonin
    Equipment;
    Main set:
    Leather Cap (Headwear) (+1 Def, +1 Agi)
    NA (Facewear)
    Cloth Shirt (Torso) (+1 def)
    Leather Pants (Legwear) (+2 def, +2 agi)
    Leather shoes (Footwear) (+3 spd)
    Flint Blade (1-Handed Weapon) (+6 atk, +1 spd)
    Flint Blade (1-Handed Weapon) (+6 atk, +1 spd)

    Wealth: 0 P 0 G 0 S 0 B 53 C
    Element: Darkness
    Inventory: Roasted Chicken Leg
    Statistics:
    Str: Med
    Atk: 18
    Def: 9
    Spd: 11
    Agi: 8
    Max HP: 20
    Luck: 100%
    Crit.Chance: 0%
    Crit.Damage: +0%
    Magic: 0
    Intelligence: 12
    Atk Spd: Med-Hi

    Property: Home in a cave
    Level: 1
    iceklaus said:

    I'll try and take 4 of them, 2 just enough to have my ration and look for gems, and 2 to keep alive and sell.

    EDIT: can you paste my current stats?

    They seem hard to catch, you manage to hunt one, and get one alive.
    The living one refuses to obey and stays uneasy in its cage, preventing you from acquiring at as a pet.

    There you go
    Username: Iceklaus
    Dask

    Class: Archer
    Race: Human
    Rank: Hunter for Turner Town
    Origin: Turner, Nexonin
    Equipment;
    Main set:
    Leather Hood (Headwear) (+4 def, +2 Spd, +2 Agi, +stealth)
    NA (Facewear)
    Leather Vest (Torso) (+7 def, +3 Agi)
    Cloth Pants (Legwear) (+3 def, +2 Spd, +2 agi)
    Flint Shoes (Footwear) (+2 def, +4 Spd, +2 Agi))
    Wooden Bow & Quiver (2-Handed Weapon) (+8 atk, +2 agi)
    Metallic Claws (Off-Hand holder) (+11 atk, -2 Spd)

    Wealth: 0 P 60 G 7 S 24 B 1 C
    Element: Fire
    Inventory: cooked deer meat x7 kg, fur x5, Rusty Knife x6 (+4 Atk, +2 Agi), Empty Wooden Bucket, Mysterious Golden Ring, Old Meat Sandwich, Bag of Snacks, 2.5 kg dragon skin, 120 kg dragon meat, black dragon wing, dragon teeth x3, dragon eye, dead rainbow bird, living rainbow bird
    Spells: Summon Ant (2% of current maximum mana)
    Statistics:
    Str: Med-Hi
    Atk: 28
    Def: 21
    Spd: 16
    Agi: 20
    Max HP: 30
    Luck: 100%
    Crit.Chance: 0%
    Crit.Damage: +0%
    Magic: 20
    Intelligence: 9
    Atk Spd: Med

    Property: Small House
    Level: 3
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    summon ant to feed the bird

    head to nearet town market after
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • MrMonkey7thMrMonkey7th Posts: 1,315Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Search the drawers and closets, check under the rug, then end the heist.
    e^i*π=-1
    This forum: Not dead. Just... sleeping.
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    iceklaus said:

    summon ant to feed the bird

    head to nearet town market after

    You summon an ant, using 0.01 mana points, the bird eats it and becomes not much less rageous.

    You head to a nearest town market, it is blooming with trade, and there seems to be a bunch of people collected around a talking man.

    Search the drawers and closets, check under the rug, then end the heist.

    You search the drawers and find a golden locket and a few banknotes worth a fortune.
    There also seems to be a drawer locked with a copper key, and you have a few of those.

    You search the closets, there are more rich clothes, mostly robes. There is also a suitcase, locked with a 4-digit password, but it doesn’t seem to be a clue leading to this number in the house.

    You check under the rug, nothing. Would you like to open the drawer and try to say a few random numbers to open the suitcase?
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • MrMonkey7thMrMonkey7th Posts: 1,315Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Oh alright. Open the drawer with a copper key. Try 5-5-5-5 into the suitcase. Then get out of here. (End heist)
    e^i*π=-1
    This forum: Not dead. Just... sleeping.
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    Oh alright. Open the drawer with a copper key. Try 5-5-5-5 into the suitcase. Then get out of here. (End heist)

    You fail the open the suitcase, but decide to just take it with you anyway since it must be so important to have a password
    You use a copper key to open the locked drawer, there is a group of different scrolls here!

    You manage to escape through a nearby window, and remember to shut it behind you, and you leave through the back, running through a few streets and alleys until you find yourself in a big, grassland field, away from any suspicion.

    Heist Successful!

    Loot:
    Ring of Deception
    Complex Wires
    Expensive Clothing
    Expensive Earrings
    Strange Scroll (LOCKED: ADAMANTIUM)
    Copper Keys x3
    Rich Notebook
    Poisoned Dagger
    Elephant Skin Sheet
    Golden Locket
    Banknotes
    Expensive Robes
    Suitcase
    Group of Scrolls


    You can return to the base now, but you can also keep a little bit of the heist without your boss knowing... he’ll give you some of the heist anyway, and appreciation if you have enough heist objects, but you got a lot anyway...
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Bump
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Bump?
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • PointedBatPointedBat Posts: 47Member ✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Name: Ekrano
    Element: Energy
    Weapon: A golden scepter with a floating cyan crystal at the end.
    (Is this way too late or can I still apply? I'll just wake up somewhere if I can.)
    You don't matter. Give up.
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    Name: Ekrano
    Element: Energy
    Weapon: A golden scepter with a floating cyan crystal at the end.
    (Is this way too late or can I still apply? I'll just wake up somewhere if I can.)

    All’s good
    Now choose an backstory, if you don’t like them you can spin for more

    Ekrano, magical soldier in the armies of Kiyas.
    Ekrano, a mage and apprentice on legend’s mountain.
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • PointedBatPointedBat Posts: 47Member ✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Ekrano, a magical soldier in the armies of Kiyas. I was hoping for an overthrown emperor but this is better.
    You don't matter. Give up.
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    Approach the talking man to observe

    Feed more ant to the bird
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
  • BrainstormBrainstorm Posts: 11,223Member ✭✭✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member

    Ekrano, a magical soldier in the armies of Kiyas. I was hoping for an overthrown emperor but this is better.

    Submitted!
    Username: PointedBat
    Ekrano

    Class: Mage
    Race: Human
    Rank: Magical Soldier in Kiyas Army
    Origin: Kiyas City, Kiyas
    Equipment;
    Main set:
    Leather Cap (Headwear) (+1 Def, +1 Agi)
    NA (Facewear)
    Leather Vest (Torso) (+3 def)
    Leather Pants (Legwear) (+2 def, +2 agi)
    Leather shoes (Footwear) (+3 spd)
    Magical Wooden Scepter (1-Handed Weapon) (+4 atk, +7 magic)

    Wealth: 0 P 0 G 0 S 0 B 38 C
    Element: Energy
    Inventory: Cooked Potato
    Statistics:
    Str: Med
    Atk: 8
    Def: 13
    Spd: 7
    Agi: 7
    Max HP: 25
    Luck: 100%
    Crit.Chance: 0%
    Crit.Damage: +0%
    Magic: 12
    Intelligence: 11
    Atk Spd: Med

    Property: Small House
    Level: 1


    You awaken one day, tired. It is 8 AM, but it is time for your first day in the magical force of Kiyas! You’re pretty hungry, too... there is only a cooked potato in the cooler, should help for a bit.
    iceklaus said:

    Approach the talking man to observe

    Feed more ant to the bird

    The bird eats the other ant, but is still as angry.

    “.. people, it is our time to act!” Continues the man. “If the dark forces continue to sabotage our lands, like they did to Samuel, Earl of Nexonin, it will be for sure the end of us all! The dark forces have already set up a camp not far from town, and are acting all big and tough on our folk!”
    People start talking, to each other in a loud voice.
    “This is unacceptable!” Continues the man. “Why aren’t there brave men, to volunteer to fight those monsters!”

    People start talking once again, a few people seem to be considering volunteering, but still havent spoken out after a few seconds.
    "Calm your caps, bro." -Brainstorm

    the following link is the best thing that could happen to you: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussions/tagged/brainstormgame

    Currently managing a large-based forum game.. DashNet RPG! Play it now: http://forum.dashnet.org/discussion/15882/dashnet-rpg-dashnets-greatest-forum-game-of-all-time
    Dashnet RPG Pastebin: https://pastebin.com/6301gzzx
  • PointedBatPointedBat Posts: 47Member ✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    I take the cooked potato, and eat enough to stop the hunger pains. I then grab my Scepter, practice some spells on the wall (if I have any at this point), and then set off on my journey to my division of the army.
    You don't matter. Give up.
  • iceklausiceklaus Posts: 1,188Member ✭✭✭
    Certified Dashnet RPG Member
    I approach the man and whisper to his ear:

    -Is there a bounty involved?

    I also try to caress the bird's belly
    the ones who dare have lives woth dying for

    shhhhh... nothing to see here
Sign In or Register to comment.